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Foreigners in Sweden bring in more to thecountry’s economy than they take out,according to a new report from the OECD thatmeasured the fiscal impact of immigration.The report, based on an analysis of 27 countries,compared the taxes paid by foreignerhouseholds to their cost to society in terms ofsocial benefits, pensions, and other societalservices.The report concluded that the net differencemakes for a positive contribution to society forthe majority of the countries involved by anaverage of €3,000 (26,000 kronor) per year andper household.In Sweden, foreign households were found toproduce a net contribution to society,generating around 1,000 kronor ($153) per yearto the state in net fiscal gains. Switzerlandtopped the tables, however, with the country’smigrants bringing in around €15,000 per year andper household.Immigrants in Sweden without Swedishcitizenship were found to be an even biggerasset to society, primarily due to lower pensioncosts, bringing in a net gain of €5,000 comparedwith a €6,000 average across the 27 countries inthe report.Sweden’s Integration Minister took to Twitterto voice his support for the study, writing thathe is “often asked on Twitter about the costs ofimmigration. Now, even the OECD is supportingthe answer I usually give.”The OECD noted that for countries with higherimmigration levels such as Sweden, raising thelevels of employment among foreigners to oneon par with native-born population wouldgenerate “significant economic returns”.Sweden has seen a large increase inimmigration in recent years, though numbersdropped slightly in 2011 compared to 2010. Thenation’s population reached 9.5 million in 2011after a increase of 67,000 from the previous year.”Governments must do everything they can toimprove immigrants’ job prospects,” OECDSecretary General Angel Gurría, said inpresenting the report in Brussels together withEU Commissioner for Home Affairs CeciliaMalmström.”Tackling high and long-term unemploymentnow is essential. Continuing to help immigrantsintegrate will also ensure they can play theirpart in driving growth as the global economyrecovers.”Foreigners account for 15 percent of Sweden’spopulation, or roughly 1.4 million people, a figurethat has seen a spike since a 2008 reform whichmade it easier for employers to recruit labourfrom non-EU countries.The report also pointed out that Sweden wasone of the top nations when it came todestinations for asylum seekers, with thecountry recording 44,000 applications in 2012compared to just 30,000 the year before.The Swedish Migration Board(Migrationsverket) predicted a further increasefor 2013 in light of the unrest in Syria, where 13percent of the 2012 asylum seekers to Swedenhailed from. A further 13 percent came fromSomalia, with 12 percent from Afghanistan

Foreigners in Sweden bring in more to the
country’s economy than they take out,
according to a new report from the OECD that
measured the fiscal impact of immigration.
The report, based on an analysis of 27 countries,
compared the taxes paid by foreigner
households to their cost to society in terms of
social benefits, pensions, and other societal
services.
The report concluded that the net difference
makes for a positive contribution to society for
the majority of the countries involved by an
average of €3,000 (26,000 kronor) per year and
per household.
In Sweden, foreign households were found to
produce a net contribution to society,
generating around 1,000 kronor ($153) per year
to the state in net fiscal gains. Switzerland
topped the tables, however, with the country’s
migrants bringing in around €15,000 per year and
per household.
Immigrants in Sweden without Swedish
citizenship were found to be an even bigger
asset to society, primarily due to lower pension
costs, bringing in a net gain of €5,000 compared
with a €6,000 average across the 27 countries in
the report.
Sweden’s Integration Minister took to Twitter
to voice his support for the study, writing that
he is “often asked on Twitter about the costs of
immigration. Now, even the OECD is supporting
the answer I usually give.”
The OECD noted that for countries with higher
immigration levels such as Sweden, raising the
levels of employment among foreigners to one
on par with native-born population would
generate “significant economic returns”.
Sweden has seen a large increase in
immigration in recent years, though numbers
dropped slightly in 2011 compared to 2010. The
nation’s population reached 9.5 million in 2011
after a increase of 67,000 from the previous year.
“Governments must do everything they can to
improve immigrants’ job prospects,” OECD
Secretary General Angel Gurría, said in
presenting the report in Brussels together with
EU Commissioner for Home Affairs Cecilia
Malmström.
“Tackling high and long-term unemployment
now is essential. Continuing to help immigrants
integrate will also ensure they can play their
part in driving growth as the global economy
recovers.”
Foreigners account for 15 percent of Sweden’s
population, or roughly 1.4 million people, a figure
that has seen a spike since a 2008 reform which
made it easier for employers to recruit labour
from non-EU countries.
The report also pointed out that Sweden was
one of the top nations when it came to
destinations for asylum seekers, with the
country recording 44,000 applications in 2012
compared to just 30,000 the year before.
The Swedish Migration Board
(Migrationsverket) predicted a further increase
for 2013 in light of the unrest in Syria, where 13
percent of the 2012 asylum seekers to Sweden
hailed from. A further 13 percent came from
Somalia, with 12 percent from Afghanistan

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One thought on “Foreigners in Sweden bring in more to thecountry’s economy than they take out,according to a new report from the OECD thatmeasured the fiscal impact of immigration.The report, based on an analysis of 27 countries,compared the taxes paid by foreignerhouseholds to their cost to society in terms ofsocial benefits, pensions, and other societalservices.The report concluded that the net differencemakes for a positive contribution to society forthe majority of the countries involved by anaverage of €3,000 (26,000 kronor) per year andper household.In Sweden, foreign households were found toproduce a net contribution to society,generating around 1,000 kronor ($153) per yearto the state in net fiscal gains. Switzerlandtopped the tables, however, with the country’smigrants bringing in around €15,000 per year andper household.Immigrants in Sweden without Swedishcitizenship were found to be an even biggerasset to society, primarily due to lower pensioncosts, bringing in a net gain of €5,000 comparedwith a €6,000 average across the 27 countries inthe report.Sweden’s Integration Minister took to Twitterto voice his support for the study, writing thathe is “often asked on Twitter about the costs ofimmigration. Now, even the OECD is supportingthe answer I usually give.”The OECD noted that for countries with higherimmigration levels such as Sweden, raising thelevels of employment among foreigners to oneon par with native-born population wouldgenerate “significant economic returns”.Sweden has seen a large increase inimmigration in recent years, though numbersdropped slightly in 2011 compared to 2010. Thenation’s population reached 9.5 million in 2011after a increase of 67,000 from the previous year.”Governments must do everything they can toimprove immigrants’ job prospects,” OECDSecretary General Angel Gurría, said inpresenting the report in Brussels together withEU Commissioner for Home Affairs CeciliaMalmström.”Tackling high and long-term unemploymentnow is essential. Continuing to help immigrantsintegrate will also ensure they can play theirpart in driving growth as the global economyrecovers.”Foreigners account for 15 percent of Sweden’spopulation, or roughly 1.4 million people, a figurethat has seen a spike since a 2008 reform whichmade it easier for employers to recruit labourfrom non-EU countries.The report also pointed out that Sweden wasone of the top nations when it came todestinations for asylum seekers, with thecountry recording 44,000 applications in 2012compared to just 30,000 the year before.The Swedish Migration Board(Migrationsverket) predicted a further increasefor 2013 in light of the unrest in Syria, where 13percent of the 2012 asylum seekers to Swedenhailed from. A further 13 percent came fromSomalia, with 12 percent from Afghanistan

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